We Offer These Libations…

After living on our Valiant 32 for roughly 120 hours, we were happy to take her out on our first shake-down cruise. Our agenda was simple:  Make it through the channels into Galveston Bay, complete the renaming ceremony, and then go sailing!

Since we had been planning on taking her out all week, our excitement and anxiety had been building. When the time came, we were thrilled to get the boat out of her slip and into open waters. To get into the bay, we had to follow a series of channels. Luckily there was a power boat in front of us to show the way and it helped that the channels were well marked. We made our way into some neighborhoods, past the Kemah Boardwalk and through some areas which we want to later explore by land as well.

Once in Galveston Bay, we had to go through the process of renaming our sailboat.  According to legend, each and every vessel is recorded by name in the Ledger of the Deep and is known personally to Poseidon, or Neptune, the god of the sea.  In order to change a vessel’s name,  we must 1st purge its name from the Ledger and from Poseidon’s memory. The name changing ceremony is a lengthy and wordy process which requires 3 stages and 3 bottles of champagne.

The first ceremony was to wipe the previous name from the Ledger of the Deep. It requires 1 bottle of champagne (minus a bit for the captain and 1st mate) and a metal tag with the old name written on it to be thrown into the ocean to be wiped clean. 

“Oh mighty and great ruler of the seas and oceans, to whom all ships and we who venture upon your vast domain are required to pay homage, implore you in your graciousness to expunge for all time from your records and recollection the name, redacted,  which has ceased to be an entity in your kingdom. As proof thereof, we submit this ingot bearing her name to be corrupted through your powers and forever be purged from the sea. “

Immediately following, was the renaming ceremony which adds the new name to the Ledger and requires 1 more bottle of champagne (minus a bit more for the captain and 1st mate). 

“Oh mighty and great ruler of the seas and oceans, to whom all ships and we who venture upon your vast domain are required to pay homage, implore you in your graciousness to take unto your records and recollection this worthy vessel hereafter and for all time known as Nymeria, guarding her with your mighty arm and trident and ensuring her of safe and rapid passage throughout her journeys within your realm.”

The final step in the renaming ceremony was to appease the gods of the winds to assure fair winds and smooth seas. We were required to pour a generous libation of champagne to Great Boreas of the North Wind, Great Zephyrus of the West Wind, Great Eurus of the East Wind and the Great Notus of the South Wind.

“Oh mighty rulers of the winds, through whose power our frail vessels traverse the wild and faceless deep, we implore you to grant this worthy vessel Nymeria the benefits and pleasures of your bounty, ensuring us of your gentle ministration according to our needs.”

After a few sips of the remaining champagne, it was time to put out the sails and have some fun. The conditions on the water were quite perfect for our first solo cruise in Nymeria. The bay was calm with 10-15 knots of consistent wind. We hoisted the main and then the head sail. We were able to get close to 7 knots of speed sailing close to the wind or close hauled. Nymeria was steady and strong as we pushed our limits with letting her heel over. We were much more comfortable when having the wind from the side, at a beam reach, or from the back of the boat, on a broad reach, since she didn’t heel over so much.

Justin and I both took our turns sailing and navigating. We were having so much fun getting to know Nymeria that we almost didn’t realize that a front was fast approaching with bigger winds and waves. As we headed back through the channels and into the safety of our marina, we looked forward to a 4th bottle of champagne. This libation was just for us, to celebrate our first successful sail with Nymeria.

We have had so much fun sharing our stories with you. Please stay tuned for our next adventure!

 

The move is on!

Well, it begins, again. After four months here on the beautiful Bolivar Peninsula, we are on the move. This time across the bay to move aboard Nymeria. The boat spent the last week at the shipyard getting a new bottom job and some plumbing repairs required by our insurance. Tomorrow morning we get to relaunch her as our new home.

We will miss the quick beach access, the very quiet neighborhood, and we had just learned the name of all the bartenders on the peninsula. Its time to move on though.

Yet another session of downsizing has to happen, and everything that we have not used in the last four months needs to be stored or sold. We already downsized a ton when we left Durango to fit and live in the camper, but not enough. The boat isn’t necessarily any smaller than the camper, in-fact, living space is a bit better, but the storage space is spread through a lot of smaller and awkwardly shaped spaces.

There is also a todo list about a mile ling once we are on-board. Days worth of cleaning, light fixtures, fans, engine work, tests, more cleaning. Then, maybe a bit of sailing. First on the list is get the main water tank clean. It looks like it has been sitting with 80L of water for years. There is a layer growth all around, and a bunch of sediment at the bottom. Nothing a bit of bleach and some scrubbing cant take care of. Then its onto the engine for me. It may not need any maintenance right away, but I want to do an immediate oil change, water pump, and other general maintenance just so I can be sure, and get some experience doing it before too long.

We have our own satellite internet set to be installed on Monday, its expensive, and has many drawbacks, but we need internet, and this is our only choice as the free marina WiFi just wont cut it for our jobs.

Wish us luck!

24 hours with Nymeria

Its official, we are boat owners. Shannon and I took delivery of Nymeria on Friday and got to spend the day really getting to know her. It wasn’t an easy road to get here. It started back in July when we arrived here in Texas. After a few weeks the boat search really got going. Finally in October, after many boats toured, we found the right one. After making an offer, and taking her out for a survey and sea trial, the real test began.

It seems the hardest part of all this was actually moving the money from one account to another. Seems like such a simple task, but it we actually had to travel back in time before the internet in order to make it happen. Several phone calls, 8 hours of driving between post offices and banks, one  lost transfer check direct from the bank, and an overnight mail of “temporary” checks, I was finally able to get everything deposited in one place.  Only to have Wells Fargo question the final wire transfer, then finally agree after some persuading only because I have been an account holder since 1985. “That would be one hell of a long con” they said.

After the most stressful week I think I’ve ever had, we finally hopped aboard and moved her to our new slip at Waterford Harbor Marina. It had been over a year since our sailing courses in Thailand, and I had never actually docked anything larger than our friend Jeffs’ 22ft day sailor, so, trial by fire I guess. One lesson I remember clearly was “if your bowman isn’t bored, you are docking too fast” I took that to heart and several slow minuted later we tied up to slip 9-21.

Even before we pulled in completely, the friendliness of the sailing community started to show. The livaboard couple in the slip next to us came out to greet us and help with dock-lines. They happily listen to our story of getting there and offer congratulations and whatever advice we are in need of.

We needed to replace one of the old stern lines of the boat as it was rather old and frayed (even tied and held together by some tape) so we took off to our first official trip to West Marine (or my new toy store). They say its nearly impossible to get out of there without spending $200 on stuff. I can totally see why. “Yea, we need one of those”, “oh sure, that would be nice”, “that one light really needs replacing, so lets buy 7 and replace them all.” With an unbelievable amount of personal restraint, we walked out with a new line, one new light, and a fan. $197.95, we had done it!

Now the fun begins. The next several hours were spent folding ourselves in strange ways cleaning and testing everything we could. What pipes go where?How does this light turn on? WTF is this thing, and what does it do? Where are we going to put all our stuff? By the time the sun went down we were nasty and exhausted.

As we were finally getting ready to clean up and order a seemingly traditional first night in a new home pizza, that wonderful sailing community showed its worth again. As we walked down the dock, a couple came out and invited us to the Friday Marina Happy Hour. They meet every Friday at the pavilion and share stories and snacks. We had intended to just have our celebratory champagne and eat pizza on the boat alone, but why not be social? We ended up having way too much fun and had a few too many drinks and no real food while meeting the other owners. We finally ordered that pizza far too late and after stuffing our faces we took to our first night sleeping on the boat.

After a better night of sleep than I expected, we got up and prepared to take the boat to the shipyard for a haul-out and full bottom job. As we were getting ready, Shannon remarked “this should feel weirder.” I think I agree. For some reason things just felt OK, like we were supposed to be there.  Even our last few months in the RV never seemed too normal, just part of a vacation or something. Ill take it as a good sign.

One more week of RV living while we have the Nymeria worked on, then the adventure really begins!