In Search of Wind!

In case you didn’t know, it is hard to find a sailboat in the landlocked state of Colorado!

When Justin and I had this crazy idea a few years back about heading to the coast and finding a Sailboat, we didn’t quite know what we were getting into. If anyone knows me, you know that I love doing research and have been happily consumed with it ever since. And where did I start, the only place I could, online! Justin and I dove into YouTube and began to follow some amazing video bloggers about their adventures on the sea. Some of our favorites include: Sailing La Vagabonde, White Spot Pirates, Sailing Uma, Sailing SV DelosFollow The Boat, Wicked Salty, Cruising Lealea, and Sailing Nervous . Along with all the inspirational videos about the beauty of sailing, the wonder of traveling to vacant islands and meeting new cultures from around the world, we absorbed all the technical details that Sailing Nervous gave in their boat search and the amount of control and precision can go into a boat refit like Sailing Uma and Cruising Lealea have done and/or still doing. (Refit: repairing, restoring, renovating)

Before we got too far into the boat searching and future planning, our good friend, Jeff Leith, suggested that we spend some time sailing in order to determine if it was something at we really wanted to do. Justin had the most previous sailing experience playing around on his friend Nate’s boat in Portland and in helping Nate take his sailboat from Portland to Squamish, British Columbia. I had only toured Nate’s boat once, meaning that I had zero sailing experience. Heeding Jeff’s advice, we piggybacked onto a trip to see my nephew, Quade, graduate high school in Seoul, South Korea with a trip to Phuket, Thailand to spend a week in sailing school with Yachtpro. (See previous blog posts: Sailing Thailand Pt 1 and Sailing in Thailand Pt 2.) While there, we were able to get our American Sailing Association certifications for 101 Basic Keelboat Sailing, 103 Basic Coastal Cruising, and 104 Bareboat Cruising. (See also previous blog link) While there, we only strengthened our resolve to make this sailing thing happen!

After gaining video and actual sailing inspiration, in came the google searching! What type of sailboat do we want: ketch, cutter, sloop…? Do we want a monohull, catamaran or a trimaran? Do we want a fin, wing, bilge, centerboard, or full keel? Do we want wood, steel, fiberglass? Do we want a wheel vs tiller? And what do all of these terms mean? Of course there are more factors that we have to consider and the list is long and tedious.

As I dug deeper I learned that there was also math involved! Displacement/Length Ratio, Ballast Ratio, Sail Area/Displacement Ratio! The Displacement/Length ratio gives a sense of a boat’s speed potential – the lower the number, the faster the boat. The Ballast Ratio is the percentage of the boat’s weight that is the ballast. This number refers to the ‘stiffness’ or the resistance to the heeling or the leaning of the boat when under sail.  The Sail Area/Displacement Ratio is a measure of the power of the sails when compared to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the boat will be harder to handle.

All of this makes my head hurt but it all means that we will have to do some calculations in order to make sure that we have a comfortable ride.

A person could easily get bogged down with all the formulas and specs but in trying to simplify things for my own sanity, it all comes down to safely.

After digging through mountains of online information, we feel that a ‘blue water’ monohull sailboat would be the best fit for us. These boats are more slow and heavy but tend to be more stable in the water. Using bluewaterboats.org and Mahina Boat Consultation websites as a guide, online searches found that boats mostly fitting my criteria were in the 32-42 foot range and ran anywhere from $15000-$45,000. Pricing depends on the age, condition and location of the boat. Of course I would prefer a larger boat for more comfort and stability but that also means more money for the purchase, maintenance and docking fees. Upon arriving in Galveston last week, I started contacting brokers in the area to start the process of actually going on board some of these beautiful sailboats. We are set to go to Corpus Christi this Friday to look at an Ericson 325 and a Nicholson 35 along with a few others. We also hope to get on board a Downeaster 32 soon. We will let you know how it goes.

‘They’ say that the moment you walk onto the right boat you will know immediately if she is ‘the one.’

Week One

Its hot, like really hot. All the time. Also humid. I didn’t know hygrometers ever said anything other than 20% humidity (that’s the lowest any of them I’ve ever had registered, and it never gets above that where I’m from.) So far, I have not seen anything below 80 degrees or 80% humidity since we arrived. I’ve never really appreciated A/C until now.

That being said, things are going rather well for us. Our little RV park is full, but there are only 6 spots, and everyone seems to go home all week. Friday afternoon, through Sunday afternoon, its a bit busy and noisy, but all week long we have the whole place to ourselves. The whole of the Bolivar Peninsula seems to be just a really laid back version of my stereotypes of Texas. There are very few people here, but they all seem to be friendly, but most everyone seems to just keep to themselves. The busiest place is the beach, and that’s clearly the “main drag” of the area where big trucks and confederate flags fly proud.

We’ve somewhat settled back into a routine. I went back to work last Monday, and Shannon has spends her time gathering resources for her work that starts in August, as well as lining up yacht brokers and boat viewings for us. Instead of our usual Durango happy hours after work of Carvers Beers, Rice Monkey sushi, or our favorite Tacos Nayarit, we’ve been just trekking the 1/2 mile to the beach and enjoying a cheap beer or three while we watch the waves. Its certainly a lot cheaper this way. We’ve tried to find a local replacement for our regulars, but nothing quite lives up to them. Oh well, I cant complain about the beach.

We’ve taken a few excursions down to Galveston Island, as that seems to be the closest place to do or get anything. We have to take a ferry to get there and it is always busy (at least a 20-30 minute wait to get a car on, sometimes an hour and a half or more), but we have taken our Durango bike lifestyle and figured out that we can skip the line and walk right on with our bikes. It may be super hot and sweaty, but that’s the new normal for us.We have a plan to head down to Corpus Christi next weekend to take a look at a few boats down there. One is an Ericson 32.5, and another is a Nicholson 35. Both look quite exciting, and it feels really good to actually be moving forward and going aboard a few boats.

Its all still really exciting and a bit overwhelming that this is really happening, but I have to say, its nowhere near as hard as we though it would be. If anyone reading this is feels that need to get out and start and adventure, just do it. All that fear and unknown in your head stopping you is far easier than you think to overcome.